I’d Like to Share Something Really Special…

I am spending Thanksgiving week at home in Texas by myself, except for the dog. The rest of my family is having a Thanksgiving meal together in Iowa (hopefully, if the weather doesn’t have other plans) or on a road trip to Central Florida, a trip I was supposed to also attend. I simply cannot travel to either place. My arthritis is too bad to sit for long car rides, and in the Trump economy, school teachers can’t afford air travel. So, I had to practice being selfless once again. They needed to do these things, and I had to talk them into doing these things without me. My misfortunes can’t be allowed to ruin my family’s grace and peace, not when I can still give gifts of myself by allowing them to go and do without worrying about me.

I can’t actually say that I learned to be selfless and encouraging from Fred Rogers. He was really only one of many such teachers, a list headed by my maternal grandfather. But in a way, he is responsible for giving me the tools I use to make things like that happen.

https://www.cinemovie.tv/Movie-Reviews/a-beautiful-day-in-the-neighborhood-movie-review

Yesterday I went to the movie “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” at the Music City Mall in Lewisville. I can drive those few miles. And I freely admit to crying through a good portion of the movie. It is not really a sad movie. It is not actually a biopic. It is based on a real article in Esquire magazine by journalist Tom Junod. It is a partially fictionalized story about how the innate goodness of a man like Fred Rogers has a profound impact on the journalist, and all of the rest of us as well, through that act of caring and loving and gentle being-just-the-way-you-are. There is no doubt about it, when Tom Hanks, channeling Fred Rogers in the restaurant scene, asks for one minute of silence to think of all those people who have had a hand in making you who you are, he looks directly into the audience, he looks directly at me individually, and the entire theater is dead silent as everyone is doing exactly what the movie character is asking you to do. It was a singular moment in cinema that I have never experienced before. It touched my soul.

I left that movie theater feeling amazingly fulfilled. Was it because it was an excellent movie? It definitely was excellent. Was it because of the wonderful way Tom Hanks brought Fred Rogers back to life even though he looks nothing like him? He definitely made that happen. Or was it because the movie invoked a true angel, a once-living hand of God now gone from this world? Because Fred Rogers was that for so many kids for more than 800 episodes.

I must confess, when I was a teenager, I didn’t think much of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood“, though I saw some of those first black-and-white episodes, back when King Friday and Daniel Striped-Tiger were new. If I had to watch kids’ shows on PBS, which I often did because of younger siblings and cousins, I much preferred the color and the Muppets in “Sesame Street”.

But when I had been a teacher for a few years, and had to search hard for ways to communicate and teach for use with South Texas middle-schoolers, I began to see the true genius of Fred Rogers. He never talked down to kids. He never lost patience, even when things went wrong. He was always trying to keep it simple, even when the point he was making was as metaphorical as talking about keeping a “garden in your mind”. He was understandable. He was welcoming and relentlessly nice. And it wasn’t a TV character. It was really him.

I can’t really say this was a movie that changed my life. But maybe it did. I cried silently during a large portion of it, not because of the sad parts in the movie, but because I recognized so much of myself in the journalist waking up to the need to be as real and honest and able to connect to other people as Fred Rogers always did.

So, my conclusion to this essay that may be a movie review, or possibly an homage to Fred Rogers, is really quite simple. Thank you, Mr. Rogers. I really like you, just the way you are.

10 Comments

Filed under artists I admire, compassion, education, empathy, heroes, humor, inspiration, movie review, sharing from YouTube, strange and wonderful ideas about life, teaching

10 responses to “I’d Like to Share Something Really Special…

  1. I haven’t seen it but I’m going to. I too grew up with Mr. Rogers. I admired him so much. The more I watched the more I admired what he stood for. Even as a child it was obvious. I am certain of one thing, we need far more many more Mr. Rogers in this world. A man to look up to, ideals to aspire to. Hope belief in the goodness thatis there right before us if we but reach for it.

  2. One American icon playing another of a similar stripe.

  3. Wow! You have a beautiful wholesome spirit! What a wonderful gift! Thanks for sharing this heart-inspiration! Well wishes for the holiday! Stay encouraged and keep encouraging!💕

  4. Thank you so very much for giving honor to the man that changed educational television for this nation forever. Well written and personally engaging.

  5. Mickey,
    How do you target your audience when there has been such a vast array of stories told by you? I mean do you just throw it out there and see who responds? I am so very new to writing and I have only posted 3 blogs. I have received a lot of helpful professional feedback in a couple of days but find that a blog doesnt seem enough to cover my deep topics thoroughly. Do you mind giving some insight? Perhaps with my most recent post? Thank you immensely!

    • I have 31 years of experience teaching middle school and high school kids, so I tend to write everything as a young adult novelist with an age group of 10 to 18 in mind. That leads to a wide field of genres and ideas as kids are as varied as adults in their tastes. My blog is written for other bloggers, writers, artists, poets, photographers, and other creative types. I blog mostly about how I do the writing I do, and whatever else tickles my writer’s insane brain. I am also an artist and post my original artwork.

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