Drawing from the Past

It is almost impossible to accurately draw from the future. One of the tests of good science fiction is how much of it finds its way into reality over time.

Computers and communicators and scanners and material printers are doing things daily now that were predicted as fantastical possibilities in the Star Trek episodes of the 1960’s.

Jules Verne’s novels predicted men walking on the moon and the existence of nuclear submarines patrolling the depths of the sea.

George Orwell predicted even worse things when it comes to government electronic surveillance and governmental control of everything they can take control of.

But it has never really been the future that my writing, as a fantasist/surrealist, has been about.

All of my writing is set either before the year 2000, or 3000 years in the future in the 51st Century and beyond. And all of the science fiction involved is really more about the past than it is even about the present. These drawings of the Civil War bugle boy and the Shakespearian portrait of Prospero, Ferdinand, and Miranda, were all drawn from either photos or paintings or woodcut prints from the distant past.

In my writing I don’t try to predict the future. I write about people who are basically the same now as they were in the 16th Century. In truth, only the costumes, props, and stage technology change over time. The actors in the great performance always play the same basic characters.

2 Comments

Filed under irony, nostalgia, old art, Paffooney, strange and wonderful ideas about life, surrealism

2 responses to “Drawing from the Past

  1. Mickey, it is amazing how well some of these writers predicted things. One of my fears is we don’t seem to listen, especially about concerns over self-learning AI. Keith

    • Oh, yes. The rise of the robots and artificial lifeforms. On the Orville on Fox the Kaylons seemed nice, and then revealed they plan to kill all biologicals in the galaxy.

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